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1. Be aware of how you feel.

As soon as you sense that you are tense, obsessed or conflicted, pay attention, advises psychologist Jennifer Crocker of the Ohio State University. These emotions signal that your motivations may be tangled with self-esteem.

2. Ask yourself “Why?”

As you think about your situation, ask yourself: What am I trying to prove to others? What do I want to gain? What am I afraid to lose? If your answers revolve around either a fear of failing or the success, status and rewards that will arrive once you have accomplished your goal, you are likely chasing self-esteem.

3. Change your outlook.

Instead of focusing on your own success, think about what you might want to create or accomplish, how your efforts might benefit others or what you might learn from the experience.

4. Embrace empathy and vulnerability.

Be honest with others about your fears and challenges and listen openly to their concerns. Leadership coach Shayne Hughes of California-based consultancy Learning as Leadership says such actions allow you to cultivate compassion. Reorienting your goals in a more compassionate way can make you feel more clear-headed and at peace.

How to stop chasing self-esteem – four tips from Scientific American. Pair with Martin Seligman, father of the Positive Psychology movement, on learned optimism, Philippa Perry on how to stay sane, and philosopher Roman Krznaric on empathy. (via explore-blog)
On Being Vulnerable

We always have to appear so strong to others, so put together. Such that when others point out our shortcomings, we go on the defense and immediately start to plot revenge–how dare they act like gods when they are no more flawed than us?

But what some of…

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30, or 35

For all the drudgery that it entails, such as checking pile after pile of homework and computing grades, I love teaching. Teaching brought me out of my shell and gave me an appreciation for the nobility of this profession. I treasure the relationships…

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You were born to a life of sacrifice. In one of our talks in the car, you said you had always… http://wp.me/s2SHtw-1596View Post

You were born to a life of sacrifice. In one of our talks in the car, you said you had always… http://wp.me/s2SHtw-1596

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Sugarcoated Procrastination

group3b:

by: Thalia (Causal Analysis)

My cause-and-effect essay discussing about why do people procrastinate.

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explore-blog:

Such gorgeous vintage anatomy of plant cells. Complement with Ernst Haeckel’s stunning 19th-century biological illustrations

Awww, reminds me so much of my Bio400 days … and the illustrations I drew - painstakingly - in class.

explore-blog:

Beloved cartoonist Hugh MacLeod follows up on Ignore Everybody with The Art Of Not Sucking, a compendium of advice on the creative life.
Complement with Neil Gaiman’s commencement address on the same subject.

explore-blog:

Beloved cartoonist Hugh MacLeod follows up on Ignore Everybody with The Art Of Not Sucking, a compendium of advice on the creative life.

Complement with Neil Gaiman’s commencement address on the same subject.

The tyranny of the eight-hour block reinforces a narrow conception of sleep and how we should approach it. … The idea that we should sleep in eight-hour chunks is relatively recent.

[…]

A number of recent studies suggest that any deep sleep — whether in an eight-hour block or a 30-minute nap — primes our brains to function at a higher level, letting us come up with better ideas, find solutions to puzzles more quickly, identify patterns faster and recall information more accurately.

[…]

Gradual acceptance of the notion that sequential sleep hours are not essential for high-level job performance has led to increased workplace tolerance for napping and other alternate daily schedules.

Employees at Google, for instance, are offered the chance to nap at work because the company believes it may increase productivity.

[…]

Most of us are not fortunate enough to work in office environments that permit, much less smile upon, on-the-job napping. But there are increasing suggestions that greater tolerance for altered sleep schedules might be in our collective interest